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Noticeboard

A new telephone system will be installed at the Medical Centre on Tuesday 18 December. There is likely to be some disruption to calls from 1pm on this day - for up to three hours. We ask for your patience during this transition. This is part of a scheme to replace systems in all surgeries across Telford and Wrekin.

Flu Vaccinations

Flu vaccination is available every year on the NHS to help protect adults and children at risk of flu and its complications. Flu can be unpleasant, but if you are otherwise healthy it will usually clear up on its own within a week.

However, flu can be more severe in certain people, such as:

  • anyone aged 65 and over
  • pregnant women
  • children and adults with an underlying health condition (such as long-term heart or respiratory disease)
  • children and adults with weakened immune system

Anyone in these risk groups is more likely to develop potentially serious complications of flu, such as pneumonia (a lung infection), so it's recommended that they have a flu vaccine every year to help protect them.

The flu vaccine is routinely given on the NHS to:

  • adults 65 and over*
  • adults over 18 at risk of flu
  • pregnant women
  • children aged 2 and 3
  • children in reception class and school years 1, 2, 3, 4 and 5
  • children aged 2 to 17 years at risk of flu

* You are eligible for the flu vaccine this year (2018/19) if you will be aged 65 and over on March 31 2019 – that is, you were born on or before March 31 1954. So, if you are currently 64 but will be 65 on March 31 2019, you do qualify.

Flu vaccine is the best protection against an unpredictable virus that can cause unpleasant illness in children and severe illness/death among at-risk groups

Studies have shown that the flu vaccine will help prevent you getting the flu. It won't stop all flu viruses and the level of protection may vary, so it's not a 100% guarantee that you'll be flu-free, but if you do get flu after vaccination it's likely to be milder and shorter-lived than it would otherwise have been.

There is also evidence to suggest that the flu vaccine can reduce your risk of having a stroke.

Over time, protection from the injected flu vaccine gradually decreases and flu strains often change. So new flu vaccines are produced each year, which is why people who are advised to have the flu vaccine need it every year too.

FLU VACCINE CLINICS

Our third and final clinic will be held on Saturday 27th October 2018 for 18 – 64 year olds in clinical risk groups AND 65 years and over. Contact reception to book an appointment



 
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